Juck’s Thoughts on the World Is Not Enough

The world is not enough. It is nahht. Oh hi Mark. – Tommy Wiseau.

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It is no secret that Christopher Nolan is a huge Bond fan by his own admission. With that in mind, I can’t help but wonder if Cobb’s rappel scene from Nolan’s very own Inception was inspired by this movie. A more eerie similarity between this particular Bond film and another one of Nolan’s pictures, The Dark Knight, is between two lines of dialogue. In the World Is Not Enough, a character says, “She could be everywhere” in reference to M’s potential death by bomb. Of course, if the bomb were to have gone off, M’s remains would certainly be “everywhere.” In the Dark Knight, when Batman is interrogating the Joker as to the whereabouts of Harvey Dent, the Joker responds, “Depending on the time, he may in one spot, or several.” Interesting, how the lines of dialogue are so similar under like circumstances.

On the other side of things, this Bond film nods to an older era of Bond and refers to Live and Let Die by flipping a speedboat. Thankfully, because the universe was kind on a particular day in the editing room, there was no slide whistle sound effect include this time around!

The World Is Not Enough features another strong Q scene, one that undoubtedly served as an appropriate sendoff for Desmond Llewelyn, who died shortly after the film’s release. The scene is touching, and it marks the end of a truly spectacular Q. Brosnan brought out the best in Llewelyn, as is palpable on screen. Or perhaps it was Llewelyn who brought out the best in Brosnan. However the chemistry was conjured, the two have the greatest scenes of any Bond-Q pair to date.

I have finally determined that Brosnan handles a gun significantly better than he handles hand-to-hand combat. The manner in which he handles firearms exudes confidence and power, which is fitting, given that this Bond has proven to be more fond of including (and more apt to have) technology in his arsenal.

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I enjoyed seeing Robbie Coltrane’s Zukovsky appear once again, with his first appearance being in GoldenEye. Continuity is a rare element in Bond films, and seeing a recurring supporting character who isn’t from MI6 a pleasant treat.

Though The World Is Not Enough moves along Bond’s evolution quite nicely, the film lost much of its charm and shine as it went on, suffering from a problem possessed by a host of older Bond films. That is, the second half of the film lags. This is a decent Bond film, but it is not a standout for me.

~Juck

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Juck’s Thoughts on From Russia with Love

I’m in the process of watching every Bond movie, from the first to the most current. I will be giving my thoughts on each film as I go along. Not many people have seen every Bond film, and so I feel that this should be an interesting journey. These aren’t reviews, just thoughts. I encourage you to hop aboard. The James Bond film franchise is one of the largest out there. They’ve been around for 50 years for a reason. Let’s get started!

From Russia with Love is the first Bond film where 007 gets a gadget! It’s nothing as crafty as a laser watch, but instead, a briefcase laced with weapons and tricks. It concealed money, a knife, and tear gas. So perhaps it wasn’t the most dynamic gadget, but it was a gadget no less.

Although Bond’s modern image is being built up piece by piece, it has admittedly been tainted, in my eyes. In this movie, Bond hit a woman. Yes, he straight up struck her across the face. She posed no physical harm to him. Bond struck her upon learning of her association with the enemy. I thought that Bond was a classy Englishman. It’s a thing that I didn’t except from this character.

This isn’t Bond’s only flub in the film. He allowed the enemy to remove something from his pocket, and, just as it did in Dr. No, the decision backfired. It nearly got him killed. Bond has been doing this job for a long time, and to see him make the same mistake twice tarnishes his image.

Perhaps these moments were put into the movie to remind the audience that Bond isn’t Superman, or a flawless character.

My last issue with Bond himself was that he was difficult to take seriously. Where in the first him he was a suave, relaxed, respectable guy, he comes across this time around as a clown. One-liners are tossed out left and right, so frequently that they lose their humorous quality halfway through the film. 

I truly hope that Goldmember has less of this cheesiness, as I would prefer Bond to be taken more seriously.

The bad guy was ridiculous. His name is Number 1, the audience isn’t shown his face, and he strokes a cat. To make it even worse, a repulsive woman takes the wheel as the head goon tasked with killing Bond. She was nasty and not the least bit intimidating, clearly the inspiration for Austin Powers’ Frau. 

Unfortunately, I saw more Austin Powers in ‘From Russia with Love’ than I did Bond.

Not much is achieved in From Russia with Love. This film builds a bit on the character of Bond, but the bad guy isn’t defeated, no major plot is foiled, and there wasn’t much intrigue this time around. I am aware of the fact that Bond films, especially in their earlier years, are known for being campy. I’ll just have to take what I can get. Until the next one!

~Juck

Are Russian women the most attractive people on the planet or what? Like, actual Russian women, not that hag above. Agree with me in the comments below.

 

Juck’s Thoughts on Dr. No

So I’m in the process of watching every Bond movie, from the first to the most current. I will be giving my thoughts on each film as I go along. Not many people have seen every Bond film, and so I feel that this should be an interesting journey. These aren’t reviews, just thoughts. I encourage you to hop aboard. The James Bond film franchise is one of the largest out there. They’ve been around for 50 years for a reason. Let’s get started! Dr. No was an interesting film in the sense that it established James Bond’s image, which still remains intact today.

In this film, Bond receives his iconic Walther PPK,

he remarks that his vodka martini mustn’t be shaken,

he drops the still-famous “Bond…James Bond,”

and he womanizes. A lot.

There are certainly many more staples to be tacked onto the Bond series, and I imagine that they will be coming up in nearing installments, but these inseparable qualities were introduced in Dr. No.

What I find especially interesting is that, in this film, Bond plays detective more than he plays spy. He’s a lot like 24’s Jack Bauer, piecing together clues and following leads. Also, his only piece of equipment was his Walther PPK. No spy gadgets or anything of that sort were present in Dr. No.

Notably, this movie contains the most badass spider kill ever put to screen. Granted, I don’t recall a spider kill in any other film, unless you count the Hobbit, or maybe Harry Potter. Regardless, it was badass. Dr. No, the villain, was an intimidating character, though I feel that he should have been given more screen time. He had robotic hands that were extremely powerful, and seeing him do some more with those would have been well appreciated. It was during the last 20 minutes of the film that flashes of Austin Powers entered my mind. A goon repeating the countdown of a rocket launch threw me back to Frau and her ridiculous hair.

Over all, watching how Bond started was an intriguing experience. I look forward to the next movie. ~Juck

Tell me of the biggest spider scare that you have experienced. I am genuinely interested. I’ve had a few disturbing run-ins myself.